Furbearer Updates and Reminders

  • Grizzly Bear Awareness

    • Grizzly bear distribution and numbers are generally increasing in Montana, particularly in the western half of the state.
    • Bears may be present anywhere in the western half of the state.
    • For tips on avoiding a surprise encounter or conflict with bears, visit fwp.mt.gov/bear-aware.
    • FWP recommends that hunters carry and know how to use bear spray when hunting and trapping in potential grizzly bear country.
    • When possible, trappers should set traps so they can be checked from a distance.
  • Wolf Trapping Information

    • Information on wolf trapping dates and quotas, as well as mapped occupied grizzly bear habitat, can be found on the wolf hunting and trapping dashboard. Find the link at fwp.mt.gov/hunt/regulations/wolf.
  • Updated Grizzly Bear Habitat Map

    • The updated occupied grizzly bear habitat map and subsequent areas affected by the wolf trapping season floating start date can be found on page 14.
  • Marten Trapping Closure

    • The marten trapping closure now includes that portion of Montana north of I-90 and east of I-15.
  • Non-Resident Trapping Licenses

    • Non-resident trapping licenses now apply to furbearers and are available for purchase at regional FWP offices. See page 3 for more details.
  • Trapper Education Requirement

    • Trapper education is required for any resident trapper who has not purchased a trapping license for three years in their lifetime (does not need to be consecutive). This does not apply to those trapping for the purposes of livestock or property protection.
  • Trapping Dates in Occupied Grizzly Bear Habitat

    • Trapping dates in occupied grizzly bear habitat may open prior to Dec. 31. Check the FWP website for the status of trapping dates beginning Nov. 21.
  • Special Trapping Regulations in Lynx Protection Zones

    • Special trapping regulations apply in Lynx Protection Zones. See page 13 for details.
  • Reporting Unlawful Captures

    • The capture of any animal that cannot be lawfully trapped, including domestic animals, must be reported to FWP within 24 hours.
  • E-Tags Available for Wolf License

    • E-tags are available for wolf licenses for added convenience.

Definitions

  • Bait (CR)

    • Bait is defined as the meat or viscera of a mammal, bird, or fish, or any part thereof more than one pound in weight. Bleached bones are excluded.
  • Center Swivel (CR)

    • A swivel located on the underside of the trap as near the center of the base plate as reasonably possible. The swivel can be attached directly to the base plate at the center, attached to a D-ring centered on the base plate, or can be included in the chain at a point no more than 5 normal chain links from a centered D-ring or base plate attachment point at the center.
  • Excess Take (CR)

    • The take of a legally harvestable species after the season is closed or an individual’s possession limit has been met.
  • Fur Dealer (MCA 87-4-301)

    • Any person or persons, firm, company, or corporation engaging in or conducting wholly or in part the business of buying or selling, trading or dealing within the state of Montana, in the skins or pelts of any animal or animals, designated by the laws of Montana as furbearing or predatory animals. If such fur dealer resides in or the principal place of business is within the state of Montana, that dealer shall be deemed a resident fur dealer. All other fur dealers should be deemed nonresident fur dealers.
  • Furbearers (MCA 87-6-101)

    • Furbearing animals are legally defined as beaver, otter, muskrat, mink, marten, fisher, wolverine, bobcat, swift fox, and lynx. There is currently no season for lynx or for wolverine. Bobcats are the only furbearer that may be hunted in Montana.
  • Ground Set (CR)

    • Any trap originally set in or on the land (soil, rock, etc.). This includes any traps elevated less than 48 inches above the natural ground or current snow level.
  • Hunt (MCA 87-6-101)

    • To pursue, shoot, wound, take, harvest, kill, chase, lure, possess, or capture, or the act of a person possessing a weapon, as defined in MCA 45-2-101, or using a dog or a bird of prey for the purpose of shooting, wounding, taking, harvesting, killing, possessing, or capturing wildlife protected by the laws of this state in any location that wildlife may inhabit, whether or not the wildlife is then or subsequently taken. The term includes an attempt to take or harvest by any means, including but not limited to pursuing, shooting, wounding, killing, chasing, luring, possessing, or capturing.
  • Legal Wolf

    • Any male or female wolf, including young-of-the-year.
  • Nongame Wildlife (MCA 87-6-101)

    • Any wild mammal, bird, amphibian, reptile, fish, mollusk, crustacean, or other animal not otherwise legally classified by Montana statute or regulation. Examples of nongame wildlife are badger, raccoon, and red fox. There is no resident license required to trap nongame wildlife. Nonresidents must purchase a license in order to trap nongame wildlife.
  • Non-target Capture (CR)

    • Capture of any animal that cannot be lawfully trapped, including domestic animals.
  • Predatory Animals (MCA 87-6-101)

    • Coyote, weasel, skunk, and civet cat. There is no resident license required to trap predators. Nonresidents must purchase a license in order to trap predators.
  • Relaxing Snare

    • A relaxing snare has a snare lock that allows the snare loop to release constriction pressure on the captured animal when the cable is not taut (e.g., when the animal stops pulling, it will loosen). This means that the locking device on the snare cable operates both ways allowing the snare cable to move back and forth to some degree. Locks that only close or that use springs or other powering devices to hold them closed are not considered relaxing snares.
  • Trap (MCA 87-6-101)

    • To take or harvest or participate in the taking or harvesting of any wildlife protected by the laws of the state by setting or placing any mechanical device, snare, deadfall, pit, or device intended to take wildlife or to remove wildlife from any of these devices.
  • Water Set (CR)

    • Any trap originally set in or on any body of water. This shall include traps on floats in the water and those that are set with a minimum of one-third of the trap submerged. The term water set applies to traps set on beaver dams, in bank holes and in the water at bank slides. This shall not apply to temporarily standing water resulting from any cause, such as rainfall, snow, runoff, or flooding.

License Information

The following licenses, with the exceptions noted under "Requirements," are available at Fish, Wildlife & Parks offices and most FWP license providers throughout the state. Mail-in applications are available online at the FWP website ols.fwp.mt.gov. The current year’s trapper license is valid July 1 through June 30 of the following year.

Resident Hound Training License (RHTL)

  • Entitles license holder to use a dog or dogs to aid in pursuing mountain lions and bobcats during the hound training season from Dec. 2 - April 14 of the following year per MCA 87-2-521.
  • A person may not kill a mountain lion or bobcat with a RHTL.

Obtain a License

  • Trapper education is required for any resident that has not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons.
  • Residents who have a certification to trap wolves, but have not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons, must take trapper education to purchase a trapping license.
  • Residents who have purchased a trapper’s license in three previous seasons, but have not completed the wolf trapper certification course, must do so prior to setting traps for wolves.
  • Residents who have not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons, but wish to only trap wolves, must take the trapper education course.
  • Nonresidents who wish to trap wolves in Montana must have the wolf trapper education certification.
  • Trapper education is required for non-resident trappers targeting furbearers.

Licenses are available at all Fish, Wildlife & Parks offices, FWP license providers, and online at ols.fwp.mt.gov.

Licensing – Youth Hunting Opportunities

  • A resident or nonresident youth 12 years of age or older may hunt any game species for which their license is valid.
  • Those who will reach 12 years of age by Jan. 16, 2024, may hunt any game species, for which their license is valid, after Aug. 15 of the 2023 license year.
  • Proof of hunter education must be presented at the time of purchase.
  • Apprentice Hunters are not eligible to hunt wolves. Visit fwp.mt.gov for details.
  • In order to carry or use a firearm for any reason, a youth under 14 years of age must be accompanied by a person having charge or custody of the youth, or be under the supervision of a qualified firearms safety instructor or an adult 18 years of age or older who has been

License Specific Information and Costs

  • Base Hunting License

    • Annual fee charged at the time the hunter purchases their first hunting license.
    • $10 Resident
    • $15 Nonresident
  • Conservation License

    • Prerequisite at the time the hunter purchases their first hunting or fishing license.
    • The Conservation License allows hunters, anglers, and trappers access to all legally accessible state school trust lands. Contact a DNRC office for regulations.
    • $4 Resident (6-17, 62+)
    • $8 Resident (18-62)
    • $10 Nonresident
  • Wolf License (without a Sportsmans or Combination License)

    • Maximum of 10 per person.
    • $12 Resident
    • $50 Nonresident
  • Wolf License (with a Sportsmans or Combination License)

    • Only valid for the first wolf license purchased after purchasing a sportsmans or combination license. Must select “discounted” wolf license.
    • $10 Resident
    • $25 Nonresident
  • Bobcat Hunting License (Resident)

    • Available to resident conservation license holders 12 years of age or older.
    • $20 Resident
  • Resident General Trapping License

    • Available to resident Conservation License holders 12 years of age or older. Allows license holder to trap and hunt wolves. Also allows license holders to trap furbearers, hunt or chase bobcat.
    • Trapper education is required for any resident that has not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons. Residents who have a certification to trap wolves, but have not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons, must take trapper education to purchase a trapping license. Residents who have purchased a trapper’s license in three previous seasons, but have not completed the wolf trapper certification course, must do so prior to setting traps for wolves. Residents who have not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons, but wish to only trap wolves, must take the trapper education course. Non-residents who wish to trap wolves in Montana must have the wolf trapper education certification.
    • $20
  • Landowner Trapping License (Resident)

    • Applicant must give legal description of owned or leased land, name, address, and resident ALS number. Allows license holder to hunt and trap wolves and furbearers. License holder restricted to trapping and hunting only on their owned property and leased lands. Completion of either the Idaho or Montana wolf trapping certification class is mandatory. Issued only through FWP offices.
    • $1
  • Nonresident Trapping License

    • Available only to nonresident Conservation License holders 12 years of age or older, whose state of residence has nonresident trapper licenses available to Montana trappers. Completion of either the Idaho or Montana wolf-trapping certification class is mandatory to trap wolves. Issued only through FWP offices. Valid only for predatory animals, nongame wildlife, wolves, and furbearers (exceptions apply).
    • $250
  • Youth Trapper, Resident

    • Available to resident conservation license holders 6 through 11 years of age. Valid only for two furbearers – mink and muskrat.
    • Free
  • Bow and Arrow (Archery)

    • A Bow and Arrow License plus the proper hunting license are required during wolf Archery Only Season.
    • $10 Resident
    • $10 Nonresident
  • Resident Hound Training (RHTL)

    • Available to resident conservation license holders 12 years of age or older.
    • $5
  • Special DNRC Recreational Use License

    • Required to trap on state school trust lands. Contact Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation to apply for this license (406-444-2074).
    • Free
  • Fur Dealer

    • Issued only through FWP Helena Headquarters, Law Enforcement Division.
    • $10 Resident
    • $10 Agent
      • Nonresident
      • Montana nonresident fur dealer license cost is the same cost as a nonresident fur dealer license in the home state of the applicant.

Hunter/Trapper Education Requirements

Hunter Education for Firearm and Archery

  • If you were born after January 1, 1985, you are required to show proof of completing a Montana Hunter Safety and Education Course (or an approved Hunter Safety Course from any other state or province) prior to applying for or purchasing a hunting license, whether the hunting license is for the rifle or archery season.
  • Bowhunter requirements: In order to purchase a Montana Bow and Arrow license, a hunter must provide a certificate of completion of a National Bowhunter Education Course or provide any prior year’s archery license from any state or province.
  • Montana law requires members of the armed forces and their dependents stationed in Montana to present a Montana hunter education certificate or similar certificate from any state or province when purchasing any Montana hunting license.
  • Duplicates: Montana certificates of completion for the Montana hunter education and/or bowhunter education courses may be obtained from FWP’s website.

Trapper Education Requirement (MCA 87-2-127)

  • A trapping license may not be issued to a resident unless the license agent processing the application determines proof of:
    • The applicant’s purchase of a trapping license in three prior trapping seasons; or
    • Completion of a trapper education course established pursuant to this section or otherwise approved by the trapper education committee.
  • Neither the department nor a license agent is required to provide records of past Montana trapper’s license purchases prior to 1990 or for trapping licenses purchased in another state.
  • A resident is not required to complete a trapper education course if the resident:
    • Is trapping for the purposes of livestock or property protection; or
    • Completes the advanced level of the youth trapper camp offered by the Montana Trappers Association.

**Trapper education is required for any resident that has not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons. Residents who have a certification to trap wolves, but have not purchased a trapping license in three prior trapping seasons, must take trapper education to purchase a trapping license. Residents who have purchased a trapper’s license in three previous seasons, but have not completed the wolf trapper certification course, must do so prior to setting traps for wolves. Residents who have not purchased a trapper’s license in three prior trapping seasons, but wish to only trap wolves, must take the trapper education course. Non-residents who wish to trap wolves in Montana must have the wolf trapper education certification. Trapper education is required for non-resident trappers targeting furbearers.

Laws and Regulations for Trapping and Hunting

In this comprehensive section, we will provide you with detailed insights into the essential laws and regulations governing trapping and hunting activities. This information covers a wide range of aspects to ensure that you have a thorough understanding of the legal framework related to trapping and hunting of furbearers, predatory animals, and nongame wildlife. Remember that compliance with these rules is crucial to promoting responsible and sustainable trapping and hunting practices.

Airborne Hunting (16 USC 742j-1)

  • Prohibition: Shooting or attempting to shoot wildlife from an aircraft is strictly prohibited. This regulation aims to maintain fair and ethical hunting practices by preventing the use of aircraft to gain an unfair advantage over wildlife.
  • Harassment Prohibition: Additionally, it is unlawful to use an aircraft to harass wildlife. This provision safeguards against any form of harassment that could harm wildlife populations or disrupt their natural behavior.

Capture of Domestic Dogs

  • Reporting Requirement: Trappers must promptly report accidental captures of domestic dogs to the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) regional offices within 24 hours. This requirement is in place to prevent harm to pets and ensure responsible trapping practices.

Checking and Placing Wolf Traps

  • Visual Checks: Trappers targeting wolves are mandated to visually check their traps at least once every 48 hours. This frequent checking is essential to minimize the suffering of captured animals and ensure humane trapping.
  • Trap Removal: Traps must be removed within 24 hours of capturing the trapper's last legally harvested wolf. This regulation promotes responsible trapping practices and prevents unnecessary suffering.
  • Dispatching Uncollared Wolves: Trappers are required to immediately dispatch any uncollared wolf they capture. This provision aims to manage wolf populations effectively and reduce the risk of misidentification.
  • Release of Uninjured Collared Wolves: In the event of capturing an uninjured collared wolf, a trapper with an unfilled bag limit has the option to release the animal. This rule allows for conservation efforts and responsible trapping practices.

Closures

  • Specific Closures: Detailed information regarding specific closures can be found on page 11 of the regulations. These closures are essential for protecting sensitive wildlife populations and habitats.

Exposed Carcass or Baiting

  • Setback Requirement: Traps or snares may not be set within 30 feet of an exposed carcass or visible bait. This regulation prevents interference with natural feeding behaviors of wildlife and ensures fair trapping practices.
  • Additional Restrictions in Lynx Protection Zones: It's crucial to be aware of additional restrictions within Lynx Protection Zones, as specified in the regulations.

Excess Take Resulting in an Unlawfully Harvested Animal (Continued)

  • Reporting Requirement (Continued): Hunters and trappers must report any unlawfully harvested animal to a local Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) warden within 24 hours. This reporting ensures transparency and compliance with regulations.

Fur Dealer License

  • Necessity: Anyone engaging in the buying, selling, or trading of raw furs in Montana must obtain a Fur Dealer License. This requirement helps monitor fur trade activities and ensure legal and ethical standards are met.
  • License Application: Individuals interested in obtaining a Fur Dealer License can find the necessary forms and information on the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) website.

Hunting Within Municipal Boundaries

  • Prohibition: Hunting with a firearm is prohibited within the boundaries of municipalities. This restriction helps maintain public safety and prevents conflicts with urban populations.
  • Exceptions: There are exceptions for archery hunting in some areas, but it is essential to be aware of local ordinances and regulations.

Liability

  • Private Property Permission: Hunters and trappers must obtain permission from private landowners before entering their property for hunting or trapping activities. Respecting private property rights is crucial to maintaining positive relationships with landowners.

Reporting Requirements (87-2-706 MCA)

  • Mandatory Reporting: All hunters and trappers must report their harvests as required by law. Reporting provides valuable data for wildlife management and ensures compliance with hunting and trapping regulations.
  • Failure to Report: Failure to report harvests can result in penalties, including the loss of hunting and trapping privileges.

Tagging Requirements

  • Proper Tagging: Properly tagging harvested animals is essential. Tags must remain attached to the animal until it is processed and consumed. This requirement helps law enforcement and wildlife managers monitor harvest numbers.

Trapping of Predatory Animals (87-2-507 MCA)

  • Regulations: Trapping of predatory animals is subject to specific regulations outlined in 87-2-507 MCA. It's essential to understand these regulations to engage in responsible trapping practices.

Unlawful Possession of Traps and Snares (87-2-523 MCA)

  • Prohibition: Possession of traps and snares during the closed season or outside permitted trapping activities is strictly prohibited. This regulation prevents unauthorized trapping and supports ethical trapping practices.

Wolf Trapping Regulations

  • Season Dates: The wolf trapping season has specific dates, and trappers must adhere to these dates to ensure legal trapping.
  • Bag Limit: Trappers must also be aware of bag limits for wolves, which vary by region. This information is crucial for responsible trapping practices.

Firearms

When it comes to wolf hunting in Montana, hunters have several options for the types of firearms they can use. This includes rifles, handguns, muzzleloaders, and shotguns with 0, 00, or slugs. Additionally, hunters can also utilize archery equipment such as bows and crossbows. It's important to note that these are the lawful methods of take for wolves in Montana, and all other methods are prohibited.

One notable aspect of wolf hunting regulations in Montana is the absence of limitations on rifle or handgun caliber. Unlike some states that impose restrictions on the caliber of firearms used for hunting, Montana allows hunters to choose the caliber that suits their preferences and needs. There are also no magazine/round capacity restrictions, giving hunters the flexibility to use firearms of their choice.

Furthermore, the use of certain rifle scopes is permitted for wolf hunting. This includes scopes with illuminated reticles, built-in range-finding capabilities, and "red dot" scopes. These scopes enhance a hunter's ability to spot and target wolves, especially in low-light conditions, providing a more effective and accurate hunting experience.

Hunter Harassment Laws

Montana has clear laws in place to prevent hunter harassment. It is unlawful to intentionally interfere with the lawful taking of a wild animal. This means that individuals should refrain from actions that disrupt or obstruct hunters who are engaged in legal hunting activities. Additionally, disturbing an individual engaged in the lawful taking of a wild animal with the intent to prevent the taking of the animal is also prohibited. These regulations are in place to protect the rights of hunters and ensure that they can pursue their activities without unnecessary disruptions.

Harvest Data Reporting

Trappers and hunters in Montana have an important responsibility when it comes to harvest data reporting. Specifically, for certain species like bobcat, otter, marten, fisher, and swift fox, individuals are required to personally provide harvest registration data at the time the pelt is presented to a designated Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) employee for tagging. This data is essential for wildlife management and helps authorities track population trends and ensure the sustainability of these species.

Hunting Hours

The authorized hunting hours in Montana can vary depending on the species being pursued. For bobcat hunting, authorized hunting hours begin one-half hour before sunrise and end one-half hour after sunset each day of the hunting season. This timeframe allows hunters to plan their outings effectively and comply with legal hunting hours.

For wolf hunting on public lands in Montana, the authorized hunting hours also begin one-half hour before sunrise and end one-half hour after sunset each day of the hunting season. Being aware of these specific hunting hours is crucial for wolf hunters to ensure they are hunting within the legal timeframes.

Hunter Orange Requirement (MCA 87-6-414)

In Montana, the Hunter Orange Requirement is a crucial regulation aimed at ensuring the safety of hunters. Here are the key points you need to know:

  • Mandatory Hunter Orange Garments: Any person hunting game animals in Montana or accompanying a hunter as an outfitter or guide must wear, as exterior garments above the waist, a total of not less than 400 square inches of hunter orange (fluorescent) material. This orange material must be visible at all times while hunting.

  • Exemptions: There are exceptions to this requirement:

    • Special Archery Season: Individuals hunting with a bow and arrow during the special archery season are exempt from the hunter orange requirement.
    • Hunting Wolves: If you are hunting wolves outside the general deer and elk season as authorized by commission rules, you are also exempt from the hunter orange requirement.
  • Bowhunters During General Firearm Seasons: It's important to note that bowhunters who are hunting for wolves during any portion of the general (firearm) seasons for deer, elk, antelope, moose, sheep, mountain goat, black bear, and mountain lion must meet the hunter orange requirement while hunting.

Indian Reservations (MCA 87-6-602, CR)

Hunting and trapping regulations on Indian Reservations in Montana are subject to specific rules and considerations. Here's a breakdown of these regulations:

  • Furbearer Regulations:

    • The Montana Fish and Wildlife (F&W) Commission has implemented rules that close all Trust lands to the hunting and trapping of all furbearers when using state licenses.
    • Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) or state pelt tags will not be provided by the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) for furbearers taken from all Trust lands.
    • However, furbearers lawfully taken under state regulations with a Montana trapping license, during an open season, from deeded "fee" lands within the exterior boundary of a reservation may be tagged by a designated FWP employee.
    • It's important to note that the bobcat season on all lands within the Flathead Indian Reservation is closed by FWP Commission Rule.
  • Wolves Regulations:

    • The F&W Commission has established rules that close all lands within the exterior boundaries of Montana's Indian Reservations to the hunting of wolves using state licenses unless there is a cooperative agreement between the tribal government and the State of Montana.
    • Currently, there are no cooperative agreements between FWP and any of the Tribal Governments in Montana. As a result, the season for the hunting of wolves by nonmembers, with a state license, is closed. For further information, individuals are encouraged to contact FWP.

Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact (IWVC):

  • Montana is a member of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact (IWVC). Under this compact, member states recognize suspensions of hunting, fishing, or trapping privileges.
  • It is unlawful for a violator whose privilege to hunt, fish, or trap is suspended to obtain or attempt to obtain a license, tag, or permit in a member state. For more information, individuals can contact 406-444-2452.

Inspection by Warden (MCA 87-1-502)

Wildlife taken must be shown to FWP enforcement personnel for inspection when requested.

Kill Site Verification (ARM 12.6.1005)

At the request of a department Game Warden, it is required to return to the kill site of any game animal, game bird, wolf, or furbearer that has been hunted or trapped.

Landowner Permission (MCA 87-6-415)

A person may not hunt or attempt to hunt furbearers, game animals, migratory game birds, nongame wildlife, predatory animals, upland game birds, or wolves while hunting on private property without first obtaining permission of the landowner, the lessee, or their agents. Regardless of whether the land is posted or not, hunters must have permission from the landowner, lessee, or their agent before hunting on private property. For the purposes of this section, the term "hunt" has the same meaning as provided in 87-6-101 and includes entering private land to: (a) retrieve wildlife; or (b) access public land to hunt.

License and Permit Possession/Use (MCA 87-6-304, 305)

It is unlawful to:

  • Hunt or trap or attempt to hunt or trap for any furbearing animal or wolf unless the person is carrying the required license or permit at the time.
  • Refuse to produce a license or permit and the identification used in purchasing a license or permit for inspection to a game warden.
  • Alter or change a license in any material manner.
  • Loan or transfer any license to another person.
  • Use a license issued to another person.
  • Have physical control over a valid and unused hunting license or permit issued to another person while in any location that the species to be hunted may inhabit. This prohibition does not apply to a person who is carrying or has physical control over a license or permit issued to that person’s spouse or to any minor when the spouse or minor is hunting with that person.

Live Furbearers

Wild furbearers captured alive must be killed or released. It is unlawful for a person to possess or transport wild furbearers alive. Live furbearing animals may not be possessed or transported except under the provisions of the fur farm or roadside zoo permits. It is unlawful to capture wild furbearers for fur farm stock.

License Validation and Tagging (MCA 87-6-411)

  • A hunter must electronically validate the license or cut out the proper month and day of the kill from the appropriate license and attach it to the animal before the carcass/hide is removed from the site of the kill or before the hunter leaves the site of the kill.
  • To properly validate a license (sometimes referred to as a tag), the triangles denoting the month and day the animal was killed must be completely cut out and removed.

Littering (MCA 75-10-212, MCA 87-6-920)

It is unlawful to dump or leave any garbage, dead animal, or other debris or refuse:

  • In or upon any highway, road, street, or alley of this state.
  • In or upon any public property, highway, street, or alley under the control of the state.
  • Within 200 yards of a public highway, road, street, or alley or public property.
  • On privately owned property where hunting, fishing, or other recreation is permitted.

A holder of a Montana resident or nonresident fishing or hunting license or camping permit convicted of littering campgrounds, public or private lands, streams, or lakes while hunting, fishing, or camping shall forfeit any current hunting, fishing, or trapping license issued by this state and the privilege to hunt, fish, camp, or trap in this state for a period of one year from the date of conviction.

Lynx Season Closed (MCA 87-6-602, CR)

Trapped lynx that are uninjured must be released immediately, and the incident must be reported to an FWP warden or biologist within 24 hours of release. If a lynx is injured, trappers must immediately notify a warden, biologist, or an FWP regional office to determine disposition and/or collection of the animal.

Marked or Radio-Collared Animals (CR)

It is lawful to harvest furbearers and wolves that have radio collars, neck bands, ear tags, and/or other markers, but markers and radio collars must be returned to FWP. Please report the killing of a marked animal to the local FWP office.

Motorized Vehicles (MCA 87-6-405)

It is unlawful for anyone to:

  • Use a motor-driven vehicle off-road on state land.
  • Use a motor-driven vehicle on a road or trail on state land if that road or trail is posted as closed by the land management agency. This restriction applies only to state land and not to federal land. For more information related to state school trust lands, see page 18.

Off Road - Federal lands (CR)

Operate, on federal public lands, a motorized wheeled vehicle off legal routes (including game retrieval). All federally approved travel plans on public lands in Montana have been adopted by the F&W Commission. Contact the appropriate land management agencies for travel plan information.

Non-target Capture Requirement (CR)

The capture of any animal that cannot be lawfully trapped or snared, including domestic animals, must be reported to FWP within 24 hours. Any such animal that is uninjured must be released prior to the trapper leaving the trap site. If unable to safely release the animal, call FWP. Exception: Any such animal that is injured or dead must promptly (with little or no delay) be reported to FWP to determine disposition and/or collection of the animal. Animals that may be lawfully trapped or snared are furbearers or wolves for which the season is open and an individual possession limit has not been reached, nongame wildlife, and predators. A trapper may NOT trap any game animal, game bird, or migratory bird.

Outfitters and Guides (MCA 37-47-301)

  • A person may not act as an outfitter or guide or advertise or otherwise represent to the public that the person is an outfitter or guide without first securing a license.
  • It is unlawful to engage in outfitting/guiding while not licensed.
  • It is unlawful to hire an outfitter or guide not licensed by the Department of Labor and Industry. For information, call 406-841-2300.

Occupied Dwellings (CR)

Killing ground sets, including all snares, set for animals larger than ground squirrels are unlawful within 1,000 feet of an occupied dwelling without written notification to the inhabitant.

Pelt Possession (CR)

It shall be unlawful for any fur dealer or fur dealer agent to purchase or possess any untagged bobcat, otter, fisher, marten, or wolverine, except those untagged furs originating outside Montana that are accompanied by an export permit or other documentation of lawful acquisition.

Pelt Tags (CR)

The pelt tag is required to remain attached to the pelt until tanned or after being exported.

Predators and Nongame Hunting

Predators and nongame species are unprotected by federal and/or state law or regulation and can be hunted in Montana year-round without a license by both resident and nonresident hunters. The State Lands Recreational License is included in the Conservation License for the purpose of hunting, fishing, and trapping and is required to hunt predators and nongame species on state school trust lands. Permission must be obtained to hunt predators and nongame species on private land.

  • Predators are classified as coyote, weasel, (striped) skunk, and civet cat (spotted skunk).
  • Nongame species are defined as any wild animal not otherwise legally classified by statute or regulation in Montana. Examples include badger, raccoon, red fox, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, marmots, tree squirrels, porcupines, and prairie dog.

Quotas and Season Closures (CR)

  • Furbearers: Furbearer seasons will close in 48 hours when a species quota or subquota is reached or approached prior to the end of the regular season. The F&W Commission has authorized the department to initiate a closure prior to reaching a quota or subquota when conditions or circumstances indicate the quota may be reached within the 48-hour closure notice period.
  • Wolves: When a quota is reached, the hunting and trapping season for the state, the region and/or WMU will close upon a 24-hour notice, but no later than Mar. 15, 2024.

Recorded Animal Sounds (MCA 87-6-401)

It is unlawful to use any recorded or electrically amplified bird or animal calls or sounds or imitations of bird or animal calls or sounds to assist in the hunting, taking, killing, or capturing of any wildlife except predatory animals, wolves, and those birds not protected by state or federal law.

 

Snares (CR)

  • Furbearers: All snares are required to be equipped with a breakaway lock device designed to release when more than 350 pounds of force is applied. Breakaway snares must be fastened to an immovable object solidly secured to the ground. The use of drags is unlawful on snares. All snares in Lynx Protection Zones must be equipped with a relaxing device. All bobcat snares in regions 1, 2, and portions of 3, 4, and 5 (see map on page 9) must be equipped with a relaxing device. Appropriate breakaway snares and relaxing devices for snares are listed on page 25.
  • Wolves: Snares are a lawful method of trapping during the wolf trapping season. Snaring is permitted on public and private lands consistent with trapping season dates, EXCEPTION: Snaring is not allowed on public lands within the Lynx Protection Zones (LPZs). Snares must be equipped with a loop stop that will close to a loop no smaller than 2.5 inches in diameter (stop placed at no less than 8 inches from end of loop). Snares must have a breakaway device rated at 1,000 lbs. or less installed on the loop end. Snares must be placed such that the bottom of the snare loop is at least 18 inches above the surface. Power-assisted (e.g., spring-loaded) snare locks are prohibited on wolf snares on public lands.

Transport of Wildlife

  • An individual other than the license holder may transport lawfully taken, properly tagged wolves.
  • It is unlawful to ship, possess, transport, or take out of state unlawfully killed wolves.
  • It is a violation of the Federal Lacey Act to transport an unlawfully taken game animal across state boundaries.
  • If you are transporting lawfully taken wildlife (including parts and/or products of live or dead animals) between the United States and any foreign country, you must complete a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declaration form. For further information contact the USFWS wildlife inspector at 406-335-4350 or fws.gov.
  • Questions concerning carcass transport may be directed to FWP enforcement at 406-444-2452 or to your home state’s wildlife division.

Trapped Wolves (CR)

  • Trappers must immediately dispatch wolves via gunshot.
  • Trappers will be allowed to dispatch trapped wolves during all hours, including nighttime.
  • You cannot "high-grade" your take by releasing a wolf that you do not want. If the wolf is radio-collared, see the section "Marked or Radio-Collared Animals."

Traps (CR)

  • Foothold traps are lawful methods during the wolf trapping season.
  • The inside jaw spread of foothold traps must not exceed 9 inches.
  • A minimum trap pan tension setting of 10 pounds is required in Regions 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 for traps set targeting wolves.
  • Two swivels, including a center swivel on the base of the trap, are required for all ground set foothold traps.
  • Conibears may not be used to take wolves.

Trapping and Snaring Offenses (MCA 87-6-601)

  • A person may not use a trap or snare for the purpose of trapping or snaring a fur-bearing animal, a predatory animal, or a nongame species without proper tagging.
  • Traps or snares set on private property require permission from the landowner, the lessee, or their agents.
  • Injuring livestock in a trap or snare makes the trapper liable for damages to the owner of the livestock.
  • Willfully destroying or removing another person's trap or snare without permission is prohibited.
  • From March 1 to Oct. 1 of each year, a person may remove any snare from land owned or leased by them if the snare would endanger livestock.
  • Domestic animals are not wildlife and can be removed from any trap or snare.

Two-way Communication (ARM 12.6.1010)

The use of two-way electronic communication is prohibited:

  • While in the act of hunting game animals or wolves to aid in the taking or locating of live animals.
  • While hunting mountain lion or bobcats with dogs when the dogs are placed or physically released on tracks or a scent trail.
  • To avoid game check stations or FWP enforcement personnel.
  • To facilitate unlawful hunting activity.
  • The use of two-way electronic communication for safety or other legitimate purposes is exempt.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (CR)

  • The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for the purposes of hunting wolves is prohibited.

Waste of Furbearers (MCA 87-6-603)

A person may not waste a furbearing animal by purposely or knowingly:

  • Failing to pick up traps or snares at the end of the trapping season so that the pelt of a fur-bearing animal is wasted.
  • Attending traps or snares so that the furbearing animals are wasted.
  • Wasting the pelt of any furbearing animal.

Waste of Game

  • Wolves are excluded from being considered as "suitable for food." The wolf carcass may be taken in possession or left in the field (with pelt) as per Montana law.

Private Lands – Night Hunting

  • Wolves may be hunted on private lands at all hours of the day or night.
  • For night hunting on private lands, the use of artificial light and night vision scopes are allowed. Infrared and thermal imaging technology are prohibited.

Reporting Requirements (CR)

All successful wolf hunters and trappers must personally report their wolf kill within 24 hours regardless of their intent to retain possession of the hide and skull.

To report a wolf harvest, follow these steps:

  1. Call the wolf reporting number at 1-877-FWP-WILD (1-877-397-9453) or 406-444-0356.
  2. Provide the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • ALS number
    • Species (wolf)
    • Date of harvest
    • WMU/region
    • Specific location (legal description)
    • Sex of the harvested wolf

Hunters can also report their harvest online at FWP Montana through myfwp.

When reporting a wolf harvest, it is unlawful to provide false information.

Successful hunters in backcountry areas will be allowed to report a wolf harvest within 24 hours of reaching a trailhead.

Pelt Tagging/Inspection (CR)

A hunter or trapper that lawfully harvests a wolf and wishes to retain possession of the hide and skull, or captures a wolf that must be dispatched, is required to present the hide and skull to a designated FWP employee within 10 days after harvest for tagging.

The tagging process includes:

  • Tagging the hide.
  • The hide tag must remain attached to the hide until it is tanned.

Failure to present the hide and skull to FWP personnel within 10 days of harvest may result in confiscation.

Trappers must also personally present the pelts of bobcat, fisher, marten, otter, and swift fox within 10 days of the calendar close of the season for tagging. Trappers are required to provide harvest registration data at the time of tagging.

Specimen Collection (CR)

Lower Jaw

  • Hunters or trappers harvesting a bobcat, otter, and/or swift fox must provide a cleaned and air-dried complete lower jaw (both sides) for aging before a pelt tag is issued. This information helps set harvest quotas.
  • Remove as much flesh as possible and allow it to air dry. Do not store or transport it in plastic; use a paper bag or cardboard box.
  • The jaw may be returned upon request.

Carcasses (Fisher)

  • The entire and intact carcass of all fisher must be turned in to FWP in good condition when presenting the pelt for tagging.
  • Skulls will be retained by FWP for processing and examination and may be returned to the owner if requested.

Transfer of Possession (MCA 87-6-411)

  • A person licensed to hunt and authorized to possess a carcass of a wolf that requires mandatory department biological inspection may transfer possession of all or part of that wolf to any person after leaving the site of the kill.
  • A statement of possession must be completed on a form prescribed by the department, signed by the licensed person and the recipient, and accompany the carcass.
  • Hunters must still personally report their harvest by phone even if a transfer form is completed.
  • It is unlawful to possess, ship, transport, sell, or purchase any wild wolf harvested in Montana without proper tagging.
  • If a hunter does not wish to retain possession of the hide and skull, they are still required to call the wolf reporting number and personally provide harvest information to FWP within 10 days after harvest.
  • Transfer of possession does not apply to furbearers.

Setbacks for Furearer Trapping

Ground Sets Along Roads and Highways

Ground sets using 7 x 7 inches and larger body-gripping traps, and all snares, are unlawful within the right-of-way of county roads, state and federal highways, and interstates. Along county roads with no defined right of way these ground sets are unlawful within 50 feet from the edge of the road.

Jaw Spread Sizes of Common Conibear Traps

  • 110 - 4.5 inches
  • 120 - 4.5 inches
  • 160 - 6 inches
  • 220 - 7 inches
  • 280 - 8 inches
  • 330 - 10 inches

Setbacks and Trapping on Public Land with Ground Sets and/or Snares

The following regulations and setbacks apply to all federal and state public lands for the trapping of furbearers, predatory animals, and non-game wildlife at any time.

Recessing Large Body Grip Traps on Land

Ground sets using 7 x 7 inches and larger body-gripping traps must have the trigger recessed a minimum of 7 inches in a wood, plastic, or metal enclosure or cubby that provides a maximum opening of 52 square inches or less.

Campgrounds and Recreational Sites

Ground sets including snares are unlawful within 1,000 feet of a designated campground or recreation site that is accessible by a highway vehicle at any time of the year. This includes areas such as, but not limited to, boat ramps or fishing access sites that have construction improvements or are accessible by a highway vehicle at any time of the year.

Roads and Trails

Ground sets and snares require a 50-foot setback from the edge of roads and hiking trails that are designated by administrative signs or numbers. Exception: Roads closed year-round to motor vehicle and OHV use are not subject to these setbacks, for instance, Kelly-humped roads that are inaccessible to motor vehicle and OHV use but are lawfully accessible by snowmobile.

Trailheads

Ground sets are unlawful within 300 feet and lethal ground sets and snares are unlawful within 1,000 feet of a designated or marked trailhead that is accessible by a highway vehicle at any time of year.

Setbacks for Wolf Trapping

Trapping on Public Land

The following regulations and setbacks apply to all public, federal, and state lands for the trapping of wolves at any time.

Campgrounds and Recreational Sites

Ground sets are prohibited within 1,000 feet of a designated campground or recreation site that is accessible by a highway vehicle. This includes areas such as, but not limited to boat ramps or fishing access sites that have construction improvements or are accessible by a highway vehicle at any time of the year.

Public Land Trailheads

On public land, foothold traps are prohibited within 1,000 feet of a designated or marked trailhead that is accessible by a highway vehicle at any time of year.

Expanded Setbacks along High Recreational Use Trails and Roads

A 500-foot setback from both edges of the trails and roads listed in this table under expanded setbacks by region is required for all ground set traps in regions 1 and 3.

Roads and Trails

Ground sets and snares require a 150-foot setback from the edge of roads and hiking trails that are designated by administrative signs or numbers. Exception: Roads closed year-round to motor vehicle and OHV use are not subject to these setbacks, for instance, Kelly-humped roads that are inaccessible to motor vehicle and OHV use but are lawfully accessible by snowmobile.

Expanded Setbacks Along High Recreational Use Trails and Roads for Furbearers and Wolves

A 500-foot setback from both edges of the trails and roads listed below is required for all ground set traps in regions 1 and 3. These setback rules do not apply to state or federal agency management or research efforts.

Region 1:

  • Hyalite Area Bozeman
  • Face Trails West Bridger Mountains
  • Gallatin Canyon
  • Paradise Valley
  • Big Fork Nordic Trail
  • Whitefish Legacy Trail
  • Eureka Rails to Trails
  • Lick Creek/Wildhorse Trail #452
  • History Rock Loops Trail #424
  • Blackmore Loops Trail #423
  • Crescent Lake Trail #213
  • West Shore Trail #431
  • E. Fork Road/Pallisade Trail #433
  • Grotto Falls Trail #432
  • Moser/Buckskin Road Loop
  • Maxy Loop Trail #62
  • Bozeman Creek/Moser Winter Trail #850 & #851
  • South Cottonwood Winter Trail #852
  • Bear Canyon Winter Trail #848
  • “M” Trails #538, #511, #512 and #513 in Sec 27 T1S, R6E
  • Sypes Trail #531
  • Middle Cottonwood Trail #586
  • Truman Gulch Trail #535
  • Porcupine Trail #34
  • Beehive Basin Winter Trail #861
  • Mill Creek Trail #945
  • Suce Creek Trail #44

No Setbacks Required for Furbearers and Wolves in Region 1

All of Sanders County (unless designated as a no trapping area or maintaining current setbacks) and southern portions of Lincoln County south of Highway 2 to Big Cherry Creek, then west following Big Cherry Creek to the intersection of Lincoln and Sanders County lines. These no setback areas supersede any setback required otherwise described on this page.

Exceptions – Maintain current setbacks of 50 ft for furbearers and 150 ft for wolf at:

  • Trout Creek-Hope Valley Road from the forest service boundary to the junction of East Fork Trout Creek and Granite Creek. Maintained road for public access in the winter. West of Trout Creek.
  • Prospect Creek Road from end of snow maintenance to junction of Prospect Creek and Demont Creek, west of East Fork.

Closures for Furbearers and Wolves

National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, and Indian Trust or Tribal Trust Lands

  • Trapping is not allowed in all National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, and Indian Trust or Tribal Trust lands, unless exceptions are specified.
  • For information or permits related to trapping in National Wildlife Refuges, please get in touch with the local refuge manager.
  • The Bobcat Hound Training Season is prohibited in all Wildlife Management Areas and National Wildlife Refuges.
  • Specific areas have restrictions on beaver and otter trapping. Refer to the beaver-specific section for more details.

Region 1 Closures

Thompson Falls Area

  • Mule Pasture recreation area in Thompson Falls.
  • Finely Flats recreation area, located between Thompson Falls and Trout Creek.
  • Trout Creek recreation area near Trout Creek.
  • Trout Creek administrative and recreation site, situated in Trout Creek.
  • Bend Ranger Station: This includes a forest service rental cabin and recreation area in the Thompson River Drainage.

Libby Area

  • Sheldon Flats recreation area in Libby.
  • Flower Creek recreation area, located south of Libby.
  • Bear Creek Ski Area, situated south of Libby.

Kalispell Area

  • Round Meadow Nordic Ski Area: Located north of Kalispell on Star Meadow Road.
  • Blacktail Nordic Ski Area, found in Lakeside.
  • Schnaus Rental Cabin-Sonderson Meadow: Situated in the North Fork of the Flathead.
  • Cedar Flats Recreation Area, located north of Columbia Falls.

Region 2 Closures

Bitterroot National Forest

  • Lake Como Ski Area: Ground sets are prohibited from December 1 to March 31. The defined area includes a portion of the Bitterroot National Forest and Ravalli County, as follows:
    • Beginning at the junction of U.S. Forest Service Roads (FS) 550 and 550A.
    • Then south and west on FS 550A to its junction with FS 13201.
    • Then north on said road to its junction with FS 550.
    • Finally, east on said road to its junction with FS 550A, marking the point of beginning.

Special Recreation Areas

  • Blue Mountain and Pattee Canyon Recreation Areas.
  • Rattlesnake National Recreation Area (portion outside and excluding the Rattlesnake Wilderness Area).
  • Bass Creek Recreation Area: These areas are closed to furbearer trapping. For information or maps of these Special Recreation Areas, please contact the local US Forest Service Office.

Deer and Elk Hunting District 282

  • Closed to the Bobcat Hound Training Season.

Regulations by Species

Beaver

  • Beaver that have been lawfully trapped can be dispatched with a firearm. Beaver that have not been trapped cannot be taken with a firearm, except in damage situations.
  • Property owners and lessees experiencing damage by beaver or muskrat as described in MCA 87-6-602(2) may request a free permit to remove them between June 1 - Aug. 31. Contact an FWP employee in your administrative region for information and permit requests.
  • During damage control activities, individuals must possess the damage permit issued to the landowner or a copy thereof. Beaver or muskrat causing damage may be removed by trapping or shooting, and a person may possess them under the damage permit.

Area Season Dates Quota Per Person Limit Reporting Pelt Tagging/Inspection Specimen Collection

Regions 1, 2, & 3

  • Nov. 1 - April 15
  • Unlimited
  • Unlimited
  • Not required
  • Not required
  • None

Regions 4, 5, 6, & 7

  • Sept. 1 – May 31
  • Unlimited
  • Unlimited
  • Not required
  • Not required
  • None

Beaver and Otter Closures

Broadwater County

  • Portions of Dry Creek, Confederate Gulch, White’s Gulch, Avalanche Gulch, Eagle Creek, Crow Creek, Jenkins Creek on public land.

Deer Lodge County

  • The entire Dry Cottonwood Creek drainage.

Gallatin County

  • That portion of the Gallatin River and all of its tributaries above the Gallatin River Bridge at the Squaw Creek Ranger Station.

Gallatin and Park Counties

  • That portion of the Yellowstone River and all of its tributaries inside the Gallatin National Forest boundary above the Yellowstone River Bridge on I-90 at Livingston.

Granite County

  • The entire Smart Creek, Wyman Creek, Swamp Gulch Creek, and Sand Basin Creek drainages.

Lewis and Clark County

  • The Blackfoot River upstream from the mouth of Bartlett Creek, including the entire Bartlett Creek drainage.

Mineral County

  • The entire Cedar Creek, Big Creek, and Flatrock Creek drainages.

Missoula and Mineral Counties

  • The entire Fish Creek drainage.

Missoula County

  • Nine Mile Creek drainage above Pine Creek.

Powell County

  • The entire Pikes Peak drainage.

Sweet Grass County

  • That portion of the East Boulder River and all its tributaries from the Gallatin National Forest boundary upstream to the headwaters of the East Boulder River.

Sweet Grass and Park Counties

  • That portion of the Main Boulder River and all its tributaries from the mouth of Falls Creek upstream to the headwaters of the Main Boulder River.

Teton County

  • The entire Teton drainage, including all tributaries of the South, Middle, West, and North Forks of the Teton River downstream to the National Forest boundary.

Bobcat Regulations

License and Quotas

  • To hunt bobcats, a license must be purchased by November 30 to be valid for the season.

  • Quotas: Furbearer seasons will close within 48 hours when a species quota is reached or approached before the end of the regular season.

  • For current harvest status information, you can call 1-800-711-8727 or 406-444-9557, 24 hours a day, or visit the FWP website, which is updated by 1 p.m. (MST) every day.

Additional Restrictions in Lynx Protection Zones

  • Certain areas are designated as Lynx Protection Zones, and additional restrictions apply. Please refer to the rules and descriptions on page 13 for details.

Season Dates, Quotas, and Limits

Region 1

  • Season: December 1 – February 15
  • Quota: 225 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: 4 bobcats in region 1 or 7 in combination with regions 1-3
  • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
  • Specimen Collection: Lower Jaw

Region 2

  • Season: December 1 – February 15
  • Quota: 150 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: 7 bobcats in region 2 or 7 in combination with regions 1-3
  • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
  • Specimen Collection: Lower Jaw

Region 3

  • Season: December 1 – February 15
  • Quota: 150 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: 5 bobcats in region 3 or 7 in combination with regions 1-3
  • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
  • Specimen Collection: Lower Jaw

Region 4

  • Season: December 1 – March 1
  • Quota: 100 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: No per person limit

Region 5

  • Season: December 1 – March 1
  • Quota: 50 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: No per person limit

Region 6

  • Season: December 1 – March 1
  • Quota: 25 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: No per person limit

Region 7

  • Season: December 1 – March 1
  • Quota: 600 bobcats
  • Per Person Limit: No per person limit

Bobcat Hunting Season

  • Bobcat is the only animal defined by law as a furbearing animal that may be taken by hunting per MCA 87-2-606.

  • Hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Bobcat chasing during the hunting season is open each day one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Bobcats may not be hunted or taken except during bobcat hunting hours.

  • Dogs may be used to take bobcats, but no other animals defined by law as furbearing animals. Dogs may be used to hunt or chase bobcats within prescribed hunting hours and seasons.

  • Persons with a trapper license for bobcat may lawfully chase bobcats during the open hunting season and anytime after the season is closed in regions 1, 2, 3 until February 15 or regions 4, 5, 6, 7 until March 1. Nonresidents may not hunt or chase bobcats. Residents must possess a valid trapping license or bobcat hunting license to hunt and chase bobcats or an RHTL (resident hound training license) to only chase bobcats.

  • Landowner permission is required to hunt on private land, including releasing dogs or chasing bobcats during the chase-only season.

  • The bobcat season on the Flathead Indian Reservation is closed.

  • A bobcat hunting license allows a resident hunter to harvest the per person bag limit with the single license purchased by November 30th, 2023.

Resident Hound Training Season

  • Season: December 2 - April 14

  • A Resident Hound Training License entitles the license holder to use a dog or dogs to aid in pursuing mountain lions and bobcats during the hound training season from December 2 - April 14 of the following year per MCA 87-2-521. A person may not kill a mountain lion or bobcat with a RHTL.

  • Bobcat chasing is open each day one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Dogs may be used to chase bobcats within prescribed seasons. All Wildlife Management Areas, National Wildlife Refuges, and Deer, Elk, and Mountain Lion hunting district 282 are closed to the Bobcat Hound Training Season.

  • It is unlawful to release dogs on a bobcat track, allow dogs to chase a bobcat, or hold a bobcat at bay when the season is not open to hunting or chasing bobcats.

  • Bobcats may not be trapped to be later released for hunting and/or chasing with dogs. Wild furbearers captured alive must be killed or released. It is unlawful for a person to possess or transport wild furbearers alive.

Lynx Regulations

Protection under the Endangered Species Act

  • Lynx are protected by Federal law under the Endangered Species Act.

Trapping Guidelines

  • Avoid placing sets that might attract lynx.

  • Trapped lynx that are uninjured must be released immediately, and the incident must be reported to a FWP warden or biologist within 24 hours of release.

  • If a lynx is injured, trappers must immediately notify a FWP warden or biologist or an FWP regional office to determine disposition and/or collection of the animal.

  • Persons who know about the taking of a lynx shall report it by calling 1-800-TIP-MONT (800-847-6668).

Lynx Protection Zones (applicable on public lands only)

Special regulations are required on public lands in areas identified as “Lynx Protection Zones” to protect lynx and help trappers avoid accidentally taking lynx in Montana. The special regulations for areas within the Lynx Protection Zones are:

  • Rabbit or hare parts, whether for flagging purposes or for bait, may not be used within 30 feet of a set trap.

  • The use of natural flagging such as bird wings, feathers, or pieces of fur may not be used within 30 feet of a set trap.

  • The use of fresh meat baits is not allowed – only tainted meat bait is allowed (exposed to temperatures above freezing for >24 hours).

  • The use of Conibear or “body-gripping” traps is not allowed unless they meet specific criteria.

  • For trappers targeting bobcat, the use of foothold traps is not allowed unless they meet specific criteria.

  • The use of snares is not allowed unless they meet specific criteria.

  • All leaning pole sets must use poles that are no larger than 4 inches in diameter and with trap and bait sets at least 48 inches above the surface.

Take of Lynx

  • “Take” of lynx is not allowed due to their federal status as a threatened species. Captures, whether the lynx is released uninjured, is injured, or killed are all considered “take” according to the definition set by federal law and used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  • Any lynx that is caught and uninjured must be immediately released if possible. Trappers who accidentally take a lynx are required to notify a FWP warden or biologist or an FWP regional office as soon as possible or within 24 hours.

Trapping Requirements

  • Trappers targeting bobcat are required to visually check their traps at least once every 48 hours.

  • Trappers are strongly encouraged to not set traps if lynx are observed in an area or if lynx tracks are identified.

  • Trappers are also strongly encouraged to use live traps (e.g., box trap) and carry catchpoles to aid in the safe release of non-target species.

Lynx Protection Zone Descriptions

Greater Yellowstone Area

  • Portions of Gallatin, Park, Sweet Grass, Stillwater, and Carbon Counties lying within specific boundaries.

Northwest Montana

  • Portions of Lincoln, Flathead, Glacier, Lake, Missoula, Granite, Powell, Lewis and Clark, Teton, and Pondera Counties lying within specific boundaries.

Wolf Regulations

Quotas and Harvest Monitoring

  • Quotas for wolf harvests have been established, including statewide, region-specific, and WMU 313 specific quotas.

  • When a quota is reached, all hunting and trapping for the state, region, and/or WMU 313 will close upon a 24-hour notice, but no later than March 15, 2024.

  • The Fish and Wildlife Commission may make in-season adjustments to hunting and trapping regulations if certain conditions are met, such as reaching 25% of the quota in Regions 1, 2, or 3, or a non-target capture of one lynx or one grizzly bear.

  • Wolf harvests will be updated daily between 11 am and 1 pm on the MTFWP website at myfwp.mt.gov/fwpPub/speciesHuntingGuide.

Harvest Limits

  • Resident and nonresident hunters and trappers may harvest any wolf in any open WMU or region statewide during the archery-only, general, and trapping seasons.

  • A person can take up to 20 wolves, with no more than 10 via hunting and no more than 10 via trapping (maximum harvest of 20 wolves per person).

  • For hunting, a separate license is required for each wolf, while for trapping, only a trapping license is required.

Additional Restrictions

  • Baiting is legal for the hunting of wolves, but baiting restrictions apply within Lynx Protection Zones.

  • Wolves can be hunted on private lands outside of daylight hours with the use of artificial light and night vision scopes. Infrared and thermal imaging technology are prohibited. Night hunting on public lands is prohibited.

Trapping Specifics

  • Snares are a lawful method of trapping during the wolf trapping season. Snaring is permitted on public and private lands, except within Lynx Protection Zones (LPZs).

  • The trapping season in and near occupied grizzly bear habitat may start as early as Nov. 27 but is subject to adjustment based on conditions.

  • Wolf trap pan tension must be at least 10 pounds in certain regions.

  • Trappers must immediately dispatch a trapped wolf by gunshot unless authorized otherwise by FWP prior to trapping efforts.

Fisher Regulations

Quotas and Harvest Monitoring

  • Furbearer seasons for fishers will close within 48 hours when a species quota or subquota is reached or approached before the end of the regular season.

  • Stay informed about current harvest status information by calling 1-800-711-8727 or 406-444-9557, available 24 hours a day. You can also check the FWP website at fwp.mt.gov, where the toll-free line and website are updated regularly.

  • Be aware that additional restrictions apply to areas designated as Lynx Protection Zones, so refer to the rules and descriptions on page 13 for details.

Fisher Management Unit (FMU) Descriptions

  • Bitterroot FMU: Includes Mineral and Ravalli counties, as well as the portion of Missoula County south of I-90.

  • Cabinet FMU: Encompasses Sanders County and the portion of Lincoln County south of Hwy 2.

  • Yaak FMU: Covers Lincoln County north of Hwy 2.

  • Continental Divide FMU: Includes all areas east of the Bitterroot, Cabinet, and Yaak fisher units and west of the continental divide.

Fisher Quotas

Bitterroot FMU

  • Overall Quota: 5
  • Female Subquota: 1
  • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
  • Specimen Collection: Carcass

Cabinet FMU, Yaak FMU, and Continental Divide FMU

  • Quota: 0

Mink Regulations

Quotas

  • Quota: Unlimited
  • Per Person Limit: Unlimited
  • Reporting: Not required
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Not required
  • Specimen Collection: Not Collected

Muskrat Regulations

Quotas

  • Quota: Unlimited
  • Per Person Limit: Unlimited
  • Reporting: Not required
  • Pelt Tagging/Inspection: Not required
  • Specimen Collection: Not Collected

Otter Regulations

Quotas and Harvest Monitoring

  • Furbearer seasons for otters will close within 48 hours when a species quota is reached or approached before the end of the regular season.

  • Stay informed about current harvest status information by calling 1-800-711-8727 or 406-444-9557, available 24 hours a day. You can also check the FWP website at fwp.mt.gov, where the toll-free line and website are updated daily by 1 p.m. (MST).

Region-Specific Regulations

  • Region 1: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 40, Per Person Limit 4

    • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
    • Inspection/Pelt Tagging: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
    • Specimen Collection: Lower Jaw
  • Region 2: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 40, Per Person Limit 4

  • Region 3: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 36, Per Person Limit 2

  • Region 4: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 8, Per Person Limit 2

  • Region 5: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 4, Per Person Limit 2

  • Region 6: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 2, Per Person Limit 2

  • Region 7: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Apr. 15, Quota 4, Per Person Limit 2

Closures

  • All areas closed to beaver trapping are also closed to otter trapping. Refer to the list of closure areas under the beaver season section.

  • State Wildlife Management Areas have specific closures and season dates. Please check WMA Special Regulations for further details.

Recommendations to Avoid Incidental Harvest of Otter

  • Otters inhabit rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and ponds. If the otter season has closed, avoid trapping where otter sign is evident. Look for tracks and scat while scouting or setting an area for beaver.

  • When placing any kind of trap along a beaver pond, avoid putting sets near the dam crossover or near the inlet of the pond.

  • Consider using castor mounds on the edge of a pond for sets. Castor scent will attract beavers while otters are generally uninterested.

  • Avoid setting near abandoned beaver lodges and bank dens, as otters readily use them. Otters generally avoid areas where beavers are active, so make sets as close as possible to active lodges.

Trap Considerations

  • Size 330 body-gripping traps (Conibears) are commonly used for beaver trapping and are effective for otters as well.

  • To minimize accidental otter captures, you can make minor alterations to the 330 trap. Move the trigger as far as possible to one side of the trap and bend the trigger wires close together. You can also shorten the trigger length to 4 to 5 inches by cutting or bending the wires.

  • Otters, being more slender than beavers, may glide through the trap without tripping the trigger. Beaver, which tend to be larger and slightly less agile, are more likely to trigger the trap while moving through it.

  • If using foothold traps to capture beavers, avoid using them on dam crossovers, as otters often use these same areas. Castor mound sets with the trap set fairly deep are less likely to catch otters.

Swift Fox Regulations

Quotas and Closure

  • The swift fox season will close with 48 hours' notice upon reaching the regional quota or on the season closure date, whichever occurs first.

Area-Specific Regulations

  • Portion of Region 6: Season Dates Nov. 1 - Jan. 15
    • Quota: 10
    • Per Person Limit: 3
    • Reporting: Required within 24 hours of harvest
    • Inspection/Pelt Tagging: Required within 10 days of the calendar close of the season
    • Specimen Collection: Lower Jaw

Wolverine Regulations

Trappers who capture a wolverine when the season is closed or the trapper limit is met must take the following steps:

  1. Notify a FWP (Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks) warden or biologist residing in the region where the animal was taken within 24 hours.

  2. Arrange for the collection of the animal if it cannot be released uninjured.

It is unlawful for any person to retain possession of an incidentally taken wolverine.

Access to Hunting and Trapping Land in Montana

Montana offers various opportunities for hunting and trapping on different types of land, each with its own set of regulations and requirements:

Fishing Access Sites (FAS):

  • Many Fishing Access Sites offer hunting opportunities, but restrictions may apply, such as no-hunting safety zones and weapon/firearm restrictions.
  • Refer to the Fishing Access Site website for site-specific information and restrictions.

Indian Reservation Trust Lands:

  • Some reservations may offer hunting opportunities to non-members with tribal licenses.
  • Contact the appropriate Tribal Government for more information.

Montana State Parks:

  • Some State Parks provide hunting opportunities, but there may be restrictions on safety zones and types of hunting weapons/firearms.
  • Contact the specific park or visit the Montana State Parks website for site-specific information and restrictions.

Private Land Access:

  • Montana law requires permission for all hunting on private land.

Railroad Access:

  • Railroads and railroad right-of-ways are private property and may not be hunted on without permission.
  • Access to other lands (private or public) through railroad property also requires explicit permission from the railroad.

State School Trust Lands:

  • A Conservation License provides access to State School Trust lands for related activities during applicable seasons.
  • Additional permitting is required through the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) for trapping on trust lands.
  • Overnight use has specific limits, and motorized travel is restricted to public roads or designated open roads.
  • Firearms may not be discharged within a quarter mile of inhabited dwellings or outbuildings without permission.
  • Open fires are prohibited outside of designated campgrounds.
  • Trappers need a free Special Recreational Use License (SRUL) from DNRC before trapping on State School Trust lands.

State Wildlife Management Areas (WMA):

  • WMAs are generally open to hunting during the game animal hunting season.
  • WMAs with big game winter range are closed to public entry from the day following the end of the general deer-elk season or December 1, whichever is later.

Stream Access Law:

  • Stream Access Law does not allow access for trapping or snaring on navigable streams and rivers between the low and high water marks.
  • Permission from the landowner is required for trapping or snaring on private land for all non-navigable streams.

Special Regulations for Wolf Trapping on Wildlife Management Areas

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks-owned Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) provide opportunities for wolf trapping, but special regulations apply to several WMAs. Here are the details:

Blackfoot-Clearwater Wildlife Management Area:

  • This WMA has one wolf trapping unit.
  • One trapper is randomly selected each season and allowed to trap up to one limit of wolves.
  • Trapping is limited to wolves only; no other furbearing or predatory species can be taken.
  • Trapping activity is restricted to nonmotorized travel due to the winter closure area within the WMA.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) for trapping on school trust lands.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper License and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Fish Creek Wildlife Management Area:

  • The Fish Creek WMA is divided into seven trapping units.
  • Trappers are selected by random drawing and can choose a unit based on the order of names drawn.
  • Each selected trapper can trap one limit of furbearers and wolves (excluding beaver).
  • Predatory species can also be taken within the permitted unit.
  • Trapping Unit #5 has restrictions on motorized travel after December 1.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from DNRC for trapping on School Trust Lands.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper License and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Mt. Haggin Wildlife Management Area:

  • Mt. Haggin WMA has four trapping units, with a quota of four licensed trappers per unit.
  • Trappers are randomly selected and can choose an area based on the order of names drawn.
  • Each trapper can trap a limit of furbearers, wolves, and ten beavers.
  • Trapping Unit #4 has restrictions on motorized travel after December 1.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from DNRC for trapping on school trust lands.
  • Trappers wishing to take predators must contact Vanna Boccadori for a predator permit (not applicable to wolves).
  • Applicants must possess a valid trapper license and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Spotted Dog Wildlife Management Area:

  • The Spotted Dog area has one wolf trapping unit.
  • One trapper is randomly selected each season and permitted to trap up to one limit of wolves.
  • Trapping is allowed for wolves only; no other furbearing or predatory species can be taken.
  • Trapping activity is limited to nonmotorized travel within the WMA's winter closure area.
  • Access across the groomed snowmobile Route 314 is allowed for over-the-snow vehicles.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from DNRC for trapping on school trust lands.
  • Applicants must possess a valid trapper license and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Special Regulations for Furbearer Trapping on Wildlife Management Areas

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks-owned Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) offer trapping opportunities, but certain WMAs have special regulations in effect. Trappers are required to apply for a permit by September 15 to trap in these areas. Here are the details:

Fish Creek Wildlife Management Area:

  • Fish Creek WMA is divided into seven trapping units.
  • Trappers are selected through a random drawing and can choose a unit based on the order of names drawn.
  • Each selected trapper is allowed to trap a limit of furbearers and wolves, excluding beaver.
  • Predatory species can also be taken within their permitted unit.
  • Trapping Unit #5 has restrictions on motorized travel after December 1.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) for trapping on School Trust Lands.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper License and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area:

  • Freezout Lake WMA has two trapping units for furbearers.
  • Trapping seasons include fall (Nov. 1 to Dec. 31) and spring (Jan. 1 to April 15).
  • Trappers are selected/assigned by random drawing.
  • Each trapper may trap only one unit and/or season per year, unless supply exceeds demand.
  • Trapping, hunting, and access within the waterfowl closure on the south end of the main lake are prohibited until Nov. 20.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper's License to apply.
  • Applicants must submit their name, address, telephone number, ALS number, and indicate the season they wish to be considered for by Sept. 15 to Brent Lonner.

Lake Helena Wildlife Management Area:

  • Lake Helena WMA consists of one trapping unit with a spring trapping season (Jan. 1 to April 15).
  • Trapping is not allowed on the area until after the waterfowl hunting season.
  • One trapper is selected by a random drawing to trap furbearers and predatory animals.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper's License to apply.
  • Applicants must submit their name, address, phone number, and ALS number by Sept. 15 to Jenny Sika.

Mt. Haggin Wildlife Management Area:

  • Mt. Haggin WMA has four trapping units, and a quota of four licensed trappers is allowed to trap furbearers and wolves, including ten beavers each.
  • Trappers are selected by a random drawing and can choose an area based on the order of names drawn.
  • Trapping Unit #4 has restrictions on motorized travel after December 1.
  • Trappers must obtain a Special Recreational Use License (application deadline September 30) from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) for trapping on School Trust Lands.
  • Trappers wishing to take predatory animals must contact Vanna Boccadori for a predator permit (not applicable to wolves).
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper License and a valid wolf trapping certification number to apply for this permit.

Trail Creek Beaver Management Area:

  • Trail Creek trapping area includes Joseph Creek and Trail Creek.
  • One trapper is selected by random drawing to trap five beavers in this unit.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper's License to apply.

Upper Madison Beaver Management Area:

  • The Upper Madison trapping area consists of seven units for beaver and otter, each with quotas.
  • Trapping season is from Nov. 1 to April 15, by permit only.
  • Trappers may select a trapping area in the order their names are drawn.
  • Each selected trapper is permitted to trap five or ten beavers depending on the area assigned.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper's License to apply.

Warm Springs Wildlife Management Area:

  • Warm Springs WMA has three trapping units for furbearers.
  • Access is mainly by foot or non-motorized boat.
  • Each selected trapper is allowed to trap one limit of furbearers, including up to five beavers per trapping unit.
  • Trappers wishing to take predatory animals must contact the FWP area manager for a predator trapping permit.
  • All trapping permits are valid through April 15.
  • Applicants must possess a valid Trapper's License to apply.

Methods for Improving Efficiency, Selectivity, and Animal Welfare

Using Pan Tension Devices

Pan tension devices are essential to prevent non-target catches. Ensuring proper tension on the pan of your trap can significantly reduce unwanted catches.

Utilizing Extra Swivels and Center-Mounted Chains

Incorporate extra swivels and center-mounted chains in your trap setups. These additions increase the chances of holding the target animals while minimizing the risk of injuries.

Employing Modern Positioning Techniques

To enhance selectivity, adopt modern positioning techniques at dirt hole sets. This approach can help you target specific animals more effectively.

Utilizing Short Trap Chains

For land sets, especially those targeting foxes and coyotes, use short trap chains. This practice minimizes the chances of non-target captures and reduces the risk of injury to the animals.

Choosing Guarded "Stop-Loss" Traps for Muskrats

When setting traps for muskrats in shallow water or dry land sets, opt for guarded "stop-loss" traps. These traps offer humane capture methods while minimizing harm to the animals.

Prioritizing Quick and Humane Dispatching Methods

Always use dispatching methods that are quick and humane to minimize suffering and ensure ethical trapping practices.

Selecting Appropriate Trap Sizes

Select trap sizes that are suitable for the target species. Foot pad catches are preferable for animals like foxes, coyotes, raccoons, and others, as they result in fewer injuries.

Choosing Baits and Lures Carefully

Use baits and lures that specifically attract the target species without attracting other animals. This helps maintain selectivity in your trapping efforts.

Employing Cage, Box, or Species-Specific Traps

Near areas where domestic animals may be present, consider using cage, box, or species-specific traps to prevent unintended captures and promote animal welfare.

Using Common Sense in Set Locations

Make informed decisions about set locations to maximize your chances of capturing target species while minimizing the risk of catching non-target animals.

Securing Trap Attachments

Use secure methods for attaching traps, tailoring them to hold the largest species found in the area in case of incidental captures.

Considering Laminated Jaws

In areas where the risk of non-target captures is high, opt for traps with laminated jaws to reduce unintended catches.

Exercising Discretion with Trap Site Placement

When setting body-gripping traps, be cautious and selective in trap site placement to minimize non-target captures.

Managing Trap Quantity

Avoid setting more traps than you can reasonably handle to ensure efficient and humane trapping practices.

Performing Early Morning Trap Checks

Conduct early morning trap checks to reduce the duration animals are held in traps, lower the risk of them escaping, and prevent theft of traps and animals.

Breakaway Snares

Breakaway snares are designed to release at a specified force to prevent unnecessary harm to animals. Here are examples of commercially manufactured breakaway lock designs that meet regulation requirements:

  • Amberg Lock with release ferrule
  • Gregerson Lock Snares
  • Snare Shop - N. D. Lock and Stop
  • Breakaway J-Hooks
  • Breakaway S-Hooks
  • Thompson Snares - Thompson Release Lock

For information on dealers offering breakaway lock devices and snares, contact the FWP State Furbearer Coordinator at 406-444-0042.

Relaxing Snares

Relaxing snares have locks that allow the snare loop to loosen when an animal stops pulling against it. Commercially available relaxing locks include:

  • Relax-A-Lock
  • Dakota Line’s Low Pro
  • Relaxing Washer Lock
  • Quarter Washer Lock
  • Berkshire Washer Lock

Ensure that the lock is not modified and is assembled with the appropriate snare cable diameter to maintain its performance.

Checking Traps

FWP recommends checking traps at least once every 48 hours to promote animal welfare and compliance with trapping regulations.

Export

When exporting pelts of bobcat, otter, or wolf from the United States, a federal CITES pelt tag (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) is required. These tags are issued by FWP during the check-in and pelt tagging process. Additionally, when transporting game, furbearers, or fish between Montana and Canada, for commercial or non-commercial purposes, complete a USFWS declaration form and inspection.

Contact the Wildlife Inspector, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, P.O. Box 165, 39825 Interstate 15, Sweetgrass, MT 59484, or call (406) 335-4350 or FAX (406) 335-4351 for more information.

Trapper Mail Survey

FWP conducts an annual harvest survey for trappers to track effort and population trends. This information is crucial for managing populations and determining appropriate harvest levels. Please complete the survey accurately and on time to contribute to the future of trapping.

Wolf Parasites

Wolves may carry parasites like mange and tapeworm. It's important to be aware of these parasites and take precautions:

  • Mange can result in fur loss in wolves. If you encounter a wolf with signs of mange, consider not taking the animal as its fur may not be in prime condition for tanning. Tag and report the kill to FWP if you shoot a wolf with mange.

  • Wolves may carry tapeworm, which poses some risk to humans. When field dressing a wolf, use gloves, and wash hands and forearms thoroughly to minimize contact with contaminated feces or fur. Follow common-sense precautions and use hand sanitizer when handling any animal. For more information, visit the FWP website at fwp.mt.gov/hunt/regulations/wolf.

Sign Up for Huntlink!

Huntlink is a free program that will allow us to send you state regulations to your email for the states you hunt in. The benefits of this are:

1. PDF Format - Downloadable

2. Able to be read with or without reception

3. Delivered right to your email with no ads

And much more!

Disclaimer:

The legal advice provided on Wild Advisor Pro is intended as a summary of the hunting, camping, hiking, and fishing laws and regulations and does not constitute legal language or professional advice. We make every effort to ensure the information is accurate and up to date, but it should not be relied upon as legal authority. For the most current and comprehensive explanation of the laws and regulations, please consult the official government websites or a qualified legal professional. Wild Advisor Pro is not responsible for any misunderstandings or misinterpretations of the information presented and shall not be held liable for any losses, damages, or legal disputes arising from the use of this summary information. Always check with the appropriate governmental authorities for the latest information regarding outdoor regulations and compliance.