Licenses & Tag Fees for Hunting and Fishing

Resident Hunting Licenses

Combination Hunting & Fishing Licenses

  • Adult Combination (18+ years): $75.
  • Youth Combination (12–17 years): $15.
  • Adult Hunting (18+ years): $38.
  • Apprentice Hunting License (12+ years): $15 (Available only at NDOW offices).

Specialty Combination Licenses (Verification Required)

  • Senior Specialty Combination (65+ years, 6 months Nevada residency): $15.
  • Serviceman Specialty Combination: $15.
  • Severely Disabled Specialty Combination: $15.
  • Disabled Veteran Specialty Combination: $15.
  • Native American Specialty Combination: $10.

Nonresident Hunting Licenses

Combination Hunting & Fishing Licenses

  • Adult Combination (18+ years): $155.
  • Youth Combination (12–17 years): $15.
  • Apprentice Hunting License (12+ years): $15 (Available only at NDOW offices).
  • 1-Day Combination Permit to Fish & Hunt Upland Game and Waterfowl (18+ years): $23, plus $8 for each additional consecutive day.

Note: All prices exclude a $1 processing fee added at the time of purchase. Licenses can be purchased at ndowlicensing.com.

Tag Fees for Big Game Hunting in Nevada

Application Fees (Nonrefundable)

  • Silver State Application: $20.
  • Partnership In Wildlife (additional to regular application): $10.
  • Big Game Tags (except mountain lion): $10.
  • Elk Management (per elk hunt application): $5.
  • Predator (per application): $3.
  • Bonus Point Only Application (exempt from elk management and predator fees): $10.
  • Processing (per application): $1.

Resident Big Game Tags

  • Deer Tag: $30.
  • Antelope Tag: $60.
  • Black Bear Tag: $100.
  • Bighorn Sheep Tag: $120.
  • Elk Tag: $120.
  • Mountain Goat Tag: $120.
  • Mountain Lion Tag: $29.

Nonresident Big Game Tags

  • Deer Tag: $240.
  • Antelope Tag: $300.
  • Black Bear Tag: $300.
  • Bighorn Sheep Tag: $1,200.
  • Antlered Elk Tag: $1,200.
  • Antlerless Elk Tag: $500.
  • Mountain Goat Tag: $1,200.
  • Mountain Lion Tag: $104.

Duplicate Tags

  • Duplicate Tag: $10.

Note: Tags for antelope, black bear, deer, elk, bighorn sheep, and mountain goat are awarded through a random, computerized tag draw process in late May. Mountain lion tags are available over the counter at Nevada license agents, online at ndowlicensing.com, and at Department offices statewide. Mountain lion season is open year-round.

Overview of Other Licenses, Tags, Permits, and Stamps

Trapping Licenses and Trap Registration

Resident Trapping Licenses

  • Adults (18+ years): $40.
  • Youth (12–17 years): $15.

Nonresident Trapping Licenses

  • Adults (18+ years): $188.

Trap Registration

  • Per Trap: $5.

Carson Lake Permits

  • Annual Use Permit: $60.
  • 1-Day Use Permit: $15.

Migratory Bird Stamps and Permits

Federal Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp

  • For Hunters 16 and Over: $25.

Swan Permits

  • Swan Permit: $10.
  • Swan Permit Application: $10.

Small Game/Upland Game

Turkey Tags

  • Resident Turkey Tag: $20.
  • Nonresident Turkey Tag: $50.
  • Turkey Tag Application: $10.

Predator Fee

  • Per Turkey Hunt Application: $3.

Note: These fees are essential for hunters and trappers in Nevada, ensuring compliance with state and federal regulations. The licenses, tags, and permits cover a range of activities, from trapping to hunting migratory birds. The funds collected are often used for wildlife conservation and habitat management.

Understanding Specialty Tags in Nevada Hunting

The Essence of Specialty Tags

Specialty tags in Nevada offer hunters unique opportunities, extending beyond the usual big game seasons and units. These tags are not just about the hunting experience; they play a crucial role in wildlife conservation. The funds from specialty tags directly support habitat and species conservation projects, benefiting Nevada's wildlife and its people. These tags can be obtained either through a draw process or purchased at special events.

Specialty Tags: Types and Benefits

There are several types of specialty tags, each with distinct advantages:

  • Heritage Tags
  • Dream Tags
  • Silver State Tags
  • Partnership in Wildlife (PIW) Tags

Benefits of holding a specialty tag include:

  • Extended hunting seasons.
  • The privilege to hunt across various open units in Nevada.
  • Opportunity to obtain multiple tags for the same species within a year.
  • No loss of bonus points upon receiving a tag.

Eligibility and Restrictions

  • An individual is eligible to draw only one tag per species annually. This rule encompasses PIW and Silver State tags.
  • It's possible to win a tag in the big game draw and also purchase a tag for the same species outside of the draw. This includes Heritage, Dream Tag, and Landowner options.
  • Specialty tags do not offer alternate or party hunt options.
  • Residency requirements apply only to PIW mule deer tags.

Tag Categories and Their Characteristics

  • Main Draw Availability: Heritage and Dream Tags
  • Issuance by Third-Party Vendors: Silver State and PIW Tags
  • Weapon Flexibility: Dream and Silver State Tags
  • Extended Season Structure: Heritage and Dream Tags
  • Unrestricted Hunting Units: All four types of specialty tags
  • Exemption from Waiting Periods and Bonus Point Costs: Heritage, Silver State, and PIW Tags
  • Possibility of Multiple Tags Per Species: Heritage and Dream Tags

2023 Specialty Tag Quotas and Restrictions

Dream and PIW Tags

  • Species: Antelope, Bighorn Sheep (Nelson and CA), Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer
  • Class: Antlered or Any
  • Season: In line with general season structures
  • Unit Restrictions: Specific limits for certain species
  • Dream and PIW Quotas: Varying numbers based on species and residency

Heritage and Silver State Tags

  • Species: Antelope, Bighorn Sheep (Nelson and CA), Elk, Mountain Goat, Mule Deer, Turkey
  • Class: Antlered or Any
  • Season: Specific dates ranging from March to December
  • Unit Restrictions: Certain species have specific unit limits
  • Heritage and SST Quotas: Differentiated based on species

License Requirements

Any person 12 years of age or older who hunts game birds or mammals in Nevada is required to have a hunting license.

(Refer to NRS 502.010)

Youths 14 years and older who possess a valid license and have received parental permission may hunt unaccompanied.

(Refer to NRS 202.300)

If a youth younger than 18 is applying for a license to hunt, the youth’s parent or legal guardian must sign the application acknowledging that they have been advised of the provisions in NRS 41.472.

(Refer to NRS 502.060)

Options For Returning A Tag And Refunds Of Hunting Fees

A person who successfully draws a tag has seven days to electronically return their tag to the Department.

Tags can be returned to the Department up to the day before the start of the hunt for bonus point restoration.

Tag return form can be found on our website at NDOW.org. If you have questions or need assistance, please call 855-542-6369.

Tags returned to the Department will be issued to an available alternate, available in the second draw, and finally available for purchase in the First-Come, First-Served program.

(Refer to NAC 502.4215)

Depending on the circumstances surrounding a hunter’s inability to hunt on a tag, that person can choose to defer that tag to the next year’s season or receive a restoration of bonus points.

(Refer to NAC 502.422)

Tag holders who are diagnosed as terminally ill can choose to transfer their tag to certain family members.

(Refer to NAC 502.422)

An applicant who is unsuccessful in the big game draw may return the purchased hunting license for a refund if the license was purchased solely to apply for a tag. Bonus points will not be awarded if a license is returned.

(Refer to NAC 502.4225)

Tags can be transferred to individual meeting specific criteria through a non-profit organization. Visit NDOW.org for more info.

(Refer to AB 89/CGR501)

Social Security Number

Laws regarding child support mandate that any person who is required by federal law to have a social security number must provide the number to obtain a business, occupational, or recreational license. Federal Law – 42 U.S. Code § 666; Nevada Statute.

(Refer to NRS 502.063, 503.5833, 504.390)

QUALIFICATIONS FOR RESIDENT LICENSES, TAGS AND PERMITS

A person is considered to be a resident of the State of Nevada if: The person is a citizen of, or is lawfully entitled to remain in, the United States; and during the 6 months next preceding the person’s application to the Department for a license, tag or permit, the person: (1) Maintained his or her principal and permanent residence in this State; (2) Was physically present in this State, except for temporary absences; and (3) Did not purchase or apply for any hunting, fishing or trapping privilege or entitlement conditional upon residency from another state, country or province.

A person who does not maintain his or her principal and permanent residence in Nevada but who is attending an institution of higher learning in this State as a full-time student is eligible for a resident license, tag or permit if, during the 6 months next preceding the person’s application to the Department for a license, tag or permit, the person: (a) Was physically present in Nevada, except for temporary trips outside of the State; and (b) Did not purchase or apply for any hunting, fishing or trapping privilege or entitlement conditional upon residency from another state, country or province.

A resident license, tag or permit issued by this State is void if the person to whom it was issued establishes or maintains his or her principal and permanent residence in and obtains any hunting, fishing or trapping privilege or entitlement conditional on residency from another state, country or province.

Principal and permanent residence means a place where a person is legally domiciled and maintains a permanent habitation in which the person lives and to which the person intends to return when he or she leaves the state in which the permanent habitation is located. The term does not include merely owning a residence in a state. (NRS 502.015) Social Security Number Laws regarding child support mandate that any person who is required by federal law to have a social security number must provide the number to obtain a business, occupational or recreational license. Federal Law – Public Law 104 – 193; Nevada Statute – NRS 502.063, 503.5833, 504.390.

Options for Returning a Turkey Tag and Refunds of Hunting Fees

Those who draw a tag have seven days to electronically return their tag to the Department.

Tags can be returned to the Department up to one day before the start of the hunt for a bonus point refund.

Tags returned to the Department will be issued to an available alternate, available to be won in the second draw, and finally available for purchase in the First-Come-First-Served program. (Refer to NAC 502.4215)

Depending on the circumstances surrounding a hunter’s inability to hunt on a tag, that person can choose to defer that tag to the next year’s season or receive a refund of bonus points. (Refer to NAC 502.422)

Tag holders who are diagnosed as terminally ill can choose to transfer their tag to certain family members. (Refer to NAC 502.422)

An applicant who is unsuccessful in a draw may return the purchased hunting license for a refund if the license was purchased solely to apply for a tag. Bonus points will not be awarded if a license is returned. (Refer to NAC 502.4225)

Military Stationed in Nevada

Active members permanently assigned to the state of Nevada and spouses and dependents, may obtain a hunting or fishing license at the same cost as Nevada residents.

(Refer to NRS 502.070)

License Requirements

Any person 12 or older who hunts game birds or mammals in Nevada is required to have a hunting license. (Refer to NRS 502.010)

Youths 14 and older who possess a valid license and have received parental permission may hunt unaccompanied. (Refer to NRS 202.300) Youths participating in youth waterfowl hunting days must be accompanied by an adult at least 18 years old. (Refer to 50 CFR 20).

License Exemptions

A hunting license is not required to hunt unprotected wild birds:

  • English house sparrows
  • European starlings
  • Eurasian collared doves

or unprotected mammals:

  • black-tailed jackrabbit
  • ring-tailed cat
  • badger
  • raccoon
  • coyote
  • skunk
  • weasel
  • ground squirrel

(Refer to NAC 503.193)

Social Security Number

Laws regarding child support mandate that any person who is required by federal law to have a social security number must provide the number to obtain a business, occupational or recreational license. Federal Law – 42 U.S. Code § 666; Nevada Statute – NRS 502.063, 503.5833, 504.390.

Possession and Display of License

Every person required to have a license while hunting, trapping or fishing shall have that license in his possession and available for inspection.

(Refer to NRS 502.120)

 

Sign Up for Huntlink!

Huntlink is a free program that will allow us to send you state regulations to your email for the states you hunt in. The benefits of this are:

1. PDF Format - Downloadable

2. Able to be read with or without reception

3. Delivered right to your email with no ads

And much more!

Disclaimer:

The legal advice provided on Wild Advisor Pro is intended as a summary of the hunting, camping, hiking, and fishing laws and regulations and does not constitute legal language or professional advice. We make every effort to ensure the information is accurate and up to date, but it should not be relied upon as legal authority. For the most current and comprehensive explanation of the laws and regulations, please consult the official government websites or a qualified legal professional. Wild Advisor Pro is not responsible for any misunderstandings or misinterpretations of the information presented and shall not be held liable for any losses, damages, or legal disputes arising from the use of this summary information. Always check with the appropriate governmental authorities for the latest information regarding outdoor regulations and compliance.